March 22, 2017
Instructors
Doug Anton

antond@hartfordschools.net
802-295-8610 Ext. *2211


Angela Conrad-Schlager

conrada@hartfordschools.net
802-295-8610 Ext. *2221



Shannon Johnson (Chair)
Photo Shannon.jpg
johnsons2@hartfordschools.net
802-295-8610 Ext. *2213


Izzy Provoncha

provonchai@hartfordschools.net
802-295-8610 Ext. *2224

Alexis Nelson

nelsona@hartfordschools.net 
802-295-8610 Ext. *2111




Global Issues                                                                             

This course is meant to serve as a broad overview of the modern world and the challenges it faces.  Global Issues begins with an introduction to the different people, religions, governments, regions, and economies found around the globe today.  It then takes an in-depth look at the global economy, conflicts around the world, and quality of life experienced by people in various countries.  This class emphasizes the development of fundamental academic and personal skills required for success throughout high school and beyond. Specifically, this course will emphasize research, writing, presenting and collaboration with peers. The course culminates in a semester-long project in which students investigate a global issue of their choosing and seek to make an impact in the world they live in.

 

US History

This course provides a general survey of U.S. History. The primary focus is upon the social, economic, and political developments which took place after the Civil War. Citizenship skills are incorporated into the basic objectives of this course. At the option of the teacher, mini-units of concentration may also be included. Upon teacher and guidance counselor recommendation, a student can be placed in the foundational skills section within this course.

 

Scholars of US History (Advanced)

Designed for the advanced student, this course will survey the entire history of the United States in great depth. Students must have above average skills in reading and writing as the pace will be accelerated. This challenging full year course would prepare students to take the SAT II Achievement Test.

 

Development of Western Civilization (Advanced)

This course involves a survey of the history and culture of the Western World from the Mediterranean civilizations to the French Revolution. This course will provide the student with information that will be needed in many college level social science courses. This is a higher level course, requiring average to above average skills in reading comprehension and writing. This course is a must for students considering any of the Social Sciences in college (i.e. Anthropology, Sociology, History, Political Science, Archeology).

 

Modern European History (Advanced)

This course concentrates on Western Europe's modern political, social, and economic development. This is a higher-level course, requiring average to above average skills in reading comprehension and writing. This course is a must for students considering any of the Social Sciences in college (i.e. Anthropology, Sociology, History, Political Science, Archeology).

 

Contemporary Social Problems

This course will study and analyze a variety of topics related to social issues in America. Some of the topics covered will be: the legal system in America, American teen culture, American high school culture, substance abuse, VT laws, violence, delinquency, race and gender issues, the American Dream and social classes, relationships, abortion, gun control, and more, based upon the students' interests. Students will be required to research various issues, work independently and in groups, and participate in class discussions.

While this course is taught at the "Standard" level, students will have the opportunity to earn an "Advanced" credit by applying to do so through the teacher and department chair. Upon teacher and guidance counselor recommendation, a student can be placed in a foundational skills section within this class.

 

Topics in the Social Sciences(Foundational)

This course is designed to present students with information that they will use in their lives during and after school. Topics of study are:

* Economics (Personal Finance)

* Justice in America

* World Geography and Cultures

* Government / Civics

Each of these four-week units is designed to meet the needs of the individual student; instruction will be highly differentiated, students will move through the topics at their own pace. Each topic will culminate with a project. This course is offered to address the student who struggles to see the relevance in their social studies classes and who wonders; "Why do I need to know this?" This course is taught at the foundational level.

 

Genocidal Studies

This course will study the history of genocide from the early 1930's to present day. It will include an extensive study of the Holocaust and its causes as well as post WWII genocides including: Cambodia, Bosnia, Rwanda and Sudan. This course will look at discrimination and intolerance and how it fuels hatred and the destruction of groups of people.

While this course is taught at the "Standard" level, students will have the opportunity to earn an "Advanced" credit by applying to do so through the teacher and department chair.

 

Gender Studies

How has gender impacted society, and subsequently history? Gender Studies is designed to find the answer to this question.  The course will be a combination of studying historical events and persons, as well as an examination of what being "male" or "female" means in different societies, past and present.  We will also celebrate the accomplishments of influential women and examine contemporary issues related to gender.  Students will be asked to complete independent research assignments, participate in class discussions, articulate their opinions, complete independent and group projects, and read short stories/articles for analysis.

 

While this course is taught at the "standard" level, students will have the opportunity to earn an "advanced" credit by applying to do so through the teacher and department chair.

 

Vermont Studies    

                                                                                              Vermont has a colorful and interesting past that has, and continues to define Vermonters: from Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain boys to the "mountain rule"; Vermont is a unique place to live.  This course will look at how the history and geography of Vermont have shaped the way Vermonters have viewed themselves and how others have viewed them.  We will look at the politics, culture, and social characteristics that make up Vermont.  This class will include a variety of trips to local sites and have guest speakers in order to fully immerse students in what Vermont is and help develop a clear understanding of the past.  In addition to reading literary works, students will be required to actively engage in Vermont history through involvement in local historical societies.  While this course is taught at the "standard" level, students will have the opportunity to earn an "advanced" credit by applying to do so through the teacher and department chair.  Upon teacher and guidance counselor recommendation, a student can be placed in a foundational skills section within this class.

 

Psychology (Advanced)

As an introduction to the field of psychology (the study of human behavior), the course will deal with topics such as human development, personality development, learning, abnormal behavior, and different therapies. Students will be exposed to the theories of Freud, Skinner, Erikson, and other leading psychologists. This course is designed much as a college introductory course with major tests, outside readings, a term paper, and discussions about current psychological topics.



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